Publications about testimony

My main publications on testimony are listed here in chronological order as are a few other papers that contain information about my anti-justificationist, two-mode theory of testimony; this theory is briefly summarised elsewhere on this website as is anti-justificationism.

  • Antoni Diller, "The Belief-filter Component", Cognitive Science Research Papers, School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, CSRP-99-9 (April 1999); a PDF version of this paper is available on this website.
  • Antoni Diller, "Evaluating Information Found in Journal Articles", in Ángel Nepomuceno, José F. Quesada and Francisco J. Salguero (editors), Logic, Language and Information: Proceedings of the First Workshop on Logic and Language: Instituto de Lógica, Lenguaje e Información, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, 29, 30 de noviembre y 1 de diciembre de 2000, [Sevilla, Kronos, 2000, ISBN 84 85101 57 X], pp. 71–78; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website.
  • Antoni Diller, "Everyday Belief-acquisition", in Gabriela P. Henning (editor), Argentine Symposium on Artificial Intelligence (ASAI2000) Proceedings: Tandil, September 5-7, 2000, [Buenos Aires, Sociedad Argentina de Informática e Investigación Operativa (SADIO), 2000], pp. 221–232; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website as is a summary.
  • Antoni Diller, "Acquiring Information from Books", in Max Bramer, Alun Preece and Frans Coenen (editors), Research and Development in Intelligent Systems XVII: Proceedings of ES2000, the Twentieth SGES International Conference on Knowledge Based Systems and Applied Artificial Intelligence, Cambridge, December 2000, [London, Springer, 2001, ISBN 1 85233 403 7], pp. 337–348; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website.
  • Antoni Diller, "A Model of Assertion Evaluation", Cognitive Science Research Papers, School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, CSRP-02-11 (November 2002); a PDF version of this paper is available on this website.
  • Antoni Diller, "Assessing Information Heard on the Radio", Cognitive Science Research Papers, School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, CSRP-02-12 (December 2002); a PDF version of this paper is available on this website.
  • Antoni Diller, "Designing Androids", Philosophy Now, ISSN 0961 5970, number 42 (July/August 2003), pp. 28–31. Subscribers to Philosophy Now can read "Designing Androids" online; a summary is available on this website. I include a brief account of my theory of testimony in this paper.
  • Antoni Diller, "Modelling Assertion Evaluation", AISB Quarterly, ISSN 0268 4179, number 114 (Autumn 2003), p. 4; the full text of this paper is freely available.
  • Antoni Diller, "How Empiricism Distorts AI and Robotics", in M. H. Hamza (ed.), Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Applications (AIA 2005), [Anaheim, Calgary, Zurich, ACTA Press, 2005, ISBN 0-88986-457-8, ISSN 1027-2666], pp. 339–343; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website. I include a brief account of my theory of testimony in this paper.
  • Antoni Diller, "Assessing Information Heard on the Radio", in Mieczyslaw A. Klopotek, Slawomir T. Wierzchon and Krzysztof Trojanowski (eds.), Intelligent Information Processing and Web Mining: Proceedings of the International IIS:IIPWM'05 Conference held in Gdansk, Poland, June 13-16, 2005, Advances in Soft Computing, [Berlin, Springer, 2005, ISBN 10-3-540-25056-6, ISBN 13-978-3-540-25055-2, ISSN 1615-3871], pp. 426–430; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website as is the longer version which was published as a Cognitive Science Research Paper by Birmingham University's School of Computer Science.
  • Antoni Diller, "Testimony from a Popperian Perspective", Philosophy of the Social Sciences, ISSN 0048-3931, vol. 38.4 (2008), pp. 419–456. Subscribers to Philosophy of the Social Sciences can read "Testimony from a Popperian Perspective" online. This is discussed or mentioned in the following:
    • Darrell Rowbottom, Popper's Critical Rationalism: A Philosophical Investigation, [London, Routledge, 2011, ISBN 978-0-415-99244-2], p. 80:

      Diller (2008, p. 421) has recently tackled testimony from a critical rationalist perspective, and shown how this is compatible with the rejection of evidentialism discussed in the previous chapter: "None of the information acquired from testimony is justified in any way; it is accepted until there are reasons to reject it."

    • Stephanie Chitpin, "Should Popper's View of Rationality Be Used for Promoting Teacher Knowledge?" forthcoming in Educational Philosophy and Theory.
    • Darrell P. Rowbottom, "Kuhn vs. Popper on criticism and dogmatism in science: a resolution at the group level", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A, vol. 42.1 (March 2011), pp. 117–124.
  • Antoni Diller, "Why AI and Robotics are Going Nowhere Fast", in Jordi Vallverdu (ed.), Thinking Machines and the Philosophy of Computer Science: Concepts and Principles, [Hershey (PA), Information Science Reference, 2010, ISBN 978-1-61692-014-2], chapter 20, pp. 328–343; the first two pages of this paper can be read for free online, but you have to pay to read the entire paper. I include a brief account of my theory of testimony on pp. 335–340 of this paper.
  • Antoni Diller, "Refining Reid's Principle of Credulity". This is a handout prepared to accompany a talk I gave at the "Thomas Reid: From His Time to Ours" conference on Thursday, the 25th of March 2010; it makes clear my indebtedness to Reid. The conference was held at the Universities of Aberdeen and Glasgow. A PDF version of this paper is available on this website as is a brief HTML summary.
  • Antoni Diller, "A Critical-rationalist Approach to Premise Acceptability", in Frans H. van Eemeren, Bart Garssen, David Godden and Gordon Mitchell (eds.), Proceedings of the 7th Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation [Amsterdam, 2011, Rozenberg Publishers and Sic Sat Publishers, ISBN 978 90 3610 243 8], chapter 34, pp. 356–365; a PDF version of this paper is available on this website. I present premise acceptability in the context of my general theory of testimony in this paper; this theory is briefly outlined in section 3, pp. 359–361.

© Antoni Diller (21 September 2014)